Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Water tenders. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Water tenders. Sort by date Show all posts

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

OPINION: What Is It Going to Take?

My daughter, Lexie, was a Watertender Board Member.  She Is now an Environmental Planner for an engineering company in Spokane.  Here's Lexie's LinkedIn information.  

By Terry Lavender
Water Tenders

"Water Tenders is a group of  people who care about the wetlands and streams in the Bear Creek area and King County..." 

I have been a Water Tenders member for all of its 25 years. Reflection is good and I feel pride and more than a little awe in what Water Tenders has accomplished. Some of the actions were the starting point for landscape-wide changes. The simple act of consistently collecting and reporting rain water led to the realization that one size does not fit all—Bear Creek gets almost double the rainfall of SeaTac and development standards must change. Careful observation and reporting led to improvements countywide in temporary erosion and sedimentation measures. We showed that people will work with their neighbors and enroll in tax incentives to protect natural habitat on their property and have been a positive voice for Bear Creek in the City of Redmond.  We have recorded baselines for species from amphibians to freshwater mussels and the biology of Paradise Valley Conservation Area with good, citizen-collected data.  We originated salmon docent programs that are now active all over King County and the list goes on.


I admit to angst about the future, however.  Groups like Water Tenders are rare.  People join forces to fight a development, support a piece of legislation or right some environmental wrong and end their involvement when the cause is won or lost.  Water Tenders has fought these battles but it has also been the slow and steady force that works to change the rules that allowed the problem, educate the neighbors, advocate for acquisition of important properties and then maintain and restore them and continually be the positive voice for a healthy Bear Creek.  Like the rain, we have been constant and it has mattered.   

Monday, October 22, 2018

Water Tenders 2018 "Salmon Seeson" is cancelled -- lack of rain

Water Tender President Susan Wilkins at  Issaquah fish hatchery 
Every year from September - October during the "Salmon Seeson" you will find the Water Tenders at North Bear Creek educating children, families and adults about the life cycle of salmon.  This Fall was the 4-year cycle for sockeye so we were expecting a good run.  The Water Tenders put up sandwich board signs along Avondale Road to direct viewers to the creek. We usually see a lot of  returning salmon but this year owing to a prolonged drought there were none to be seen so the exhibit was shut down. Usually over 100 viewers walk up the trail to see coho, sockeye and chinook salmon.

Every year the Water Tenders pick up 1-2 Chinook salmon from the Issaquah fish hatchery for their Bear Creel exhibit.  Susan Wilkins, Water Tenders President says,"this is an excellent way for viewers to see and touch the gills, scaling, and fins for show and tell."  Here's a picture of Susan at the hatchery standing by two chinook she was saving for the exhibit.


Salmon docent holding chinook 
According to their mission statement, "The Water Tenders are a group of individuals who care about the wetlands and streams in King County. We are your neighbors, friends, and family. All of us are willing donate our time and energy to preserving, protecting and restoring the wonderful natural  heritage of Washington State. We believe that it is our community’s responsibility to be good stewards of our natural resources in order to preserve them for the next generations. Water Tenders was founded in 1989 and is proud to have spearheaded and accomplished many efforts towards those ends."

A few other Water Tenders projects are removal of invasive Knotweed and Blackberry shrubs from wetlands and creeks, monitoring the Western Pearlschell populations -- an indicator of stream health -- measuring rainfall within the Bear Creek Basin, and activism to protect wetlands and streams from proposed environmental sensitive land-use developments.   

If you'd like more information about the Water Tenders or want to join this non--profit ($25) please e-mail Bob at redmondblog@gmail.com  

 -- Bob Yoder
Photos, Yoder

Monday, December 3, 2012

Water Tenders exhibit at Redmond Town Center REI store December 9

Key Club members help Water Tenders restore riparian
habitat on a Bear Creek tributary.  My daughter Lexie recruited
these volunteers.  She's on the Water Tenders Board.
This Sunday December 9th, from 11:30 am to 3:30 pm, Water Tenders will be advertising our organization at the Redmond Town Center REI store. We will have a table with displays set up by the climbing rock at the front door. Please  attend and encourage any friends and acquaintances to come down and see us. This event is partly a recruitment tool and also to inform the public about what we do and the importance of maintaining a healthy watershed.

Also, has anyone observed any Kokanee salmon in our streams this season?  If so, please contact Jennifer at King County. It is important that they get this information. She can be reached at: Jennifer.Vanderhoof@kingcounty.gov 

Water Tenders is a group of people who care about the wetlands and streams in the Bear Creek watershed of King County, Washington. We are your neighbors and we are all willing to put a little of our time into preserving, protecting, and restoring the wonderful natural heritage we are priviledge to steward. Water Tenders has been in existence since 1989 and is proud of the many accomplishments of the volunteers.

Friday, April 10, 2009

THE WATER TENDERS


The following was contributed by Water Tenders:

WATER TENDERS is a grassroots organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of our aquatic resources with special focus on the Bear Creek Basin. We strive to provide a vehicle by which as many citizens as possible can become active participants in learning about and protecting our aquatic resources. There are many ways to become involved that range from reading our popular newsletter and participating in a few educational and work party events to attending planning and opportunity meetings.

Modest memberships and grants make it possible to continue our work in the Bear Creek Watershed. In 2008 we hosted over 400 people at the "Meet the Salmon" education event. We participate in Redmond Derby Days. We advocated for the state funding for Lower Bear Creek restoration (near Redmond Town Center). Restoration projects kept us busy near the headwaters of Bear Creek. We also presented well received lecture series on watershed topics.

The Water Tenders are leaders in the restoration of NW salmon stream habitat. This year we will partner with GreenRedmond on April 25 to restore critical areas of the Hartman Park Greenbelt. On May 30 we will have plans to partner with Redmond students, scouts and volunteers to continue our restoration of Cold Creek Natural Area in Woodinville.

For details on Water Tender restoration events, the Newsletter, and how to be a member, please visit the Water Tenders website.

Sunday, December 9, 2012

Water Tenders Celebrate 25 years of care for Bear Creek Basin


Water Tenders celebrated 25 years of care for the Bear Creek Basin by exhibiting at REI today to raise awareness for the Basin and sign new members. 

They handed  out salmon cut-outs to children and told visitors about the trail along the creek only a few blocks away from REI. 

Some of the projects they've done over the years involve:  a Newsletter, Monitoring, Education and Outreach, Plant salvages and native plantings, Adopt a Natural area maintenance, Task Forces, and Advocacy. 

Want to help or at least know what is going on?  Join Water Tenders by sending $20 and your name and address and email to Water Tenders, P.O. Box 402, Woodinville, WA.  98072.   www.watertenders.org 

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Take the Plunge - Join Water Tenders!



Water Tenders Celebrate 25 Years with Anniversary Barbecue
 
It’s time to celebrate!

Water Tenders has been working hard the past 25 years to maintain and protect Bear Creek, it’s headwaters, creeks, streams, and wetlands that make up the Bear Creek Basin. It’s time to celebrate, acknowledge, and reconnect with the Water Tenders volunteers and members, past and present, who have helped make this accomplishment possible.

We are hosting a 25th Anniversary Barbecue, open to the public, at Mary Cash Farm, on Sunday, September 15 at 3:30 PM. We will be grilling hamburgers and veggie burgers and of course, we will have a 25th Anniversary cake for dessert. We will also provide the paper and plasticware for meals.

Participants are asked to bring an appetizer or salad and their own drinks (alcohol is not allowed in King County Parks).

We will have a variety of posters, booklets, flyers, and newsletters on display to illustrate our rich history.

Mary Cash Farm is located at the intersection of Woodinville-Duvall Road and 182nd Avenue NE. Overflow parking will be available  across the street in the upper parking lot of the Cottage lake Presbyterian Church and Preschool located at 18350 NE Woodinville-Duvall Place.

Please RSVP to
jan-guy@hotmail.com if you think you will attend so we can get a headcount for burgers. We hope to see you there!

Friday, September 30, 2016

Witness the salmon journey through Redmond and Woodinville

Image result for water tenders tolt salmon images
Water Tenders educating children at Bear Creek in Woodinville on the Tolt Pipeline trail

Native salmon – sockeye, chinook, coho and chum – have begun their journey from the open ocean to their birthplaces in the streams and rivers that feed into Puget Sound. You may be able to witness their amazing journey at locations around King County.

Best viewing late September to mid-November (self-guided daily during KIS Farm hours)Bear Creek in Redmond, 12526 Avondale Rd. NE
For info on docent-led visits: Linda at 425-882-1846 or 
lyhussey@comcast.net 

Oct. 5 and 12 (3-6 p.m.); Oct. 8,9,15 and 16 (1-4 p.m.) Bear Creek in Woodinville, on the Tolt Pipeline trail 
More info: 206-437-8754
Sponsored by Water Tenders


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Water Tenders is resurrected

Key Club members help to restore a Bear Creek tributary
My daughter Lexie is far left; she recruited the Key Club
members.
Water Tenders is a group of people who care about the wetlands and streams in the Bear Creek area and King county.

The torch of Water Tenders (WT) leadership was passed from President Eric Soshea to Susan Wilkins at the WT Annual Meeting last week.  Many of the of the original tenders were present, including a relative of the founder. Leader Terry Lavender and past president Dick Schaetzel were out of town. Gary Smith was present. Debbie Aftebro from Novelty Hill had never attended a WT meeting yet she collects and measures rainwater for Guy Baltzelle's program. She wanted to meet Guy but unfortunately he wasn't at the meeting.  Shirley Doolittle-Egerdahl was up front with Susan and Eric. Shirley was once President and is now the Treasurer, replacing John Reinke,who replaced Dick S.  One of the new board members, Heather Poe was president and secretary for WT in the Early 2000 - 2005 era (before Susan became a member.) Shirley Doolittle-Egerdahl was also once a president along with five others. 

In her presentation, (video) Susan held up a map of the entire Bear Creek watershed. She was re-directing and expanding our attention to the entire Bear Creek watershed.  She states:


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Water Tenders open an exhibit at the Woodinville Library

Guy Baltzelle (left) and Dick Schaetzel at the Woodinville Library Water Tender Exhibit/ JOHN REINKE

The public is invited to stop by the Woodinville Library to view the new Water Tender exhibit featuring the behavior and biology of Bear Creek's salmon and fresh water mussels.  Water Tenders reach out to educate the community on the value and presence of local salmon and shellfish and monitor the health of their ecosystem.  Learn more about the Water Tenders at the library or by visiting their website at www.watertenders.org 

Friday, January 7, 2022

VIDEO UPDATE: Bear Creek and the Stewards Who Saved a Salmon Stream


Redmond Historical Society.

Redmond Historical Society: "Bear Creek a small stream east of Seattle – some Redmond residents don’t even know it runs through town ending at the Sammamish River between Marymoor Park and Redmond Town Center -- but Bear Creek is notable for its historically strong runs of wild salmon. In the past half-century those runs have declined, especially that of the threatened Puget Sound Chinook. That trend is sadly common in Northwest waterways, but in this case the decline has been slowed by local efforts to support the fish."

GARY SMITH, a standout Redmond volunteer, Parks Commission Chair, Water Tender Board member and WRIA 8 appointee compiled a research project and supporting materials interviewing the following stewards of Bear Creek, most of them Water Tenders:

Interview with Shirley Doolittle-Egerdahl  -- Water Tender President & Board member with long family history of life at  Paradise Lake, the headwaters of Bear Creek.  

Interview with Terry Lavender, *Founder of Water Tenders and Board Chair. Terry describes her long experience on Bear Creek working with citizen groups and county officials to preserve and rehabilitate property on and around the creek.

Interview with Mayor John Marchione.

Interview with Dick Schaetzel, past President of Water Tenders (1991.)  Very active. Dick's home is 30 feet from Bear Creek. 

Interview with Tom Murdock, Executive Director of "Adopt A Stream."  

Ray Heller, King County Basin Steward for Bear Creek, 91-93

Written Q&A with Roger Dane C.O.R. Public Works.

Many thanks to the Redmond Historical Society for initiating and publishing "Bear Creek and the Stewards Who Saved a Salmon Stream," 1980 - 2020  (7/13/2021)

-- Bob Yoder, 1/7/2022

Sunday, April 26, 2009

Redmond-Cascade Conservancy forestry stewardship project is launched

This neighborhood volunteer work party for GreenRedmond removed Himalayan Blackberry weeds nearby Hartman Park on Saturday. In the Fall volunteers will plant native shrubs to beautify and protect the forest.

UPDATED, 5/1 - A garbage-ridden corner forest by the school pedestrian corridor, Church of LDS (Mormon) and the Dirt Bike Course (adjacent Hartman Park) had been severely overtaken by dense Himalayan Blackberry weeds. Citizens, the City, and Cascade Conservancy wanted to do something about it. This Saturday, twenty-five enthusiastic, committed citizen volunteers walked into this neighborhood forest with their tools. Norah Kates of the Cascade Conservancy answered our questions. Four hours later, with the use of City tools and the Cascade Conservancy knowledge, the forest floor had been "cleaned up" and we walked away satisfied and very happy with our work. This Fall, when the rains come, we will plant native, green shrubs and sapling trees!

The group of volunteers you see in this photo (click to enlarge) is a diverse mix of citizens who care about our local environment. Many of the volunteers were "Key Club" members recruited by my daughter, Lexie. Lexie is a Youth Advocate for the Water Tenders. Key Club is a Redmond High School Club devoted to charitable work. Students and parents from Horace Mann El, a local Scout pack, Water Tenders helped out.

Neighbor Lisa from the Parks farm volunteered as did two officers from the Water Tenders. Several passersby signed up for the next project. It was hard work but rewarding. We removed 40 gallons of recyclable drinking containers. (A month ago 120 gallons were removed). Invasive plants were removed from approximately 8000 square feet of forest floor . We protected and left untouched a low-lying bird's nest with two chicks.

The forest floor looks barren and brown for now. City Parks said they would remove and recycle the concrete gate blocks and may chip the wood trash. After planting native shrubs this Fall the forest floor will look beautiful! The neighborhood will just have to be patient for the new plants as we await the Fall rains. Restoration information may be posted. Comments?

Thursday, March 2, 2017

UPDATED: Bear Creek advocates hold meeting


Credit/ Water Tender John Reinke 
Water Tenders is a group of people who care about the wetlands and streams in the Bear Creek area and King county.

The torch of Water Tenders (WT) leadership was passed from President Eric Soshea to Susan Wilkins at the WT Annual Meeting last week.  Many of the of the original tenders were present, including a relative of the founder. Leader Terry Lavender and past president Dick Schaetzel were out of town. Gary Smith was present. Debbie Aftebro from Novelty Hill had never attended a WT meeting yet she collects and measures rainwater for Guy Baltzelle's program. She wanted to meet Guy but unfortunately he wasn't at the meeting.  Shirley Doolittle-Egerdahl was up front with Susan and Eric. Shirley was once President and is now the Treasurer, replacing John Reinke,who replaced Dick S.  One of the new board members, Heather Poe was president and secretary for WT in the Early 2000 - 2005 era (before Susan became a member.) Shirley Doolittle-Egerdahl was also once a president along with five others. 

In her presentation, (video) Susan held up a map of the entire Bear Creek watershed. She was re-directing and expanding our attention to the entire Bear Creek watershed.  She states:

"The Bear Creek Basin is an exceptionally natural and healthy environment for our native salmon runs given that it is so close to a major metropolitan area.  We want to direct more community involvement into observing the stream habitat and collecting year-round data (such as rainfall, water temperature, stream flow) across the whole Bear Creek Basin.  We also want to carefully monitor land use planning by the local government jurisdictions to encourage preservation and protection of our land and water resources."
Five members who volunteered for the new Board met with Susan after the meeting.  The first order of business was to select officers.  Susan is the President, Mark Reynolds is the V.P. (he told a touching "avatar" story about the value of engaging children.)  Mark is a software engineer for Nordstrom and a "take charge" kind of guy.  He is working on a new website and very motivated for WT to make a difference for kids.  Me too.

Youth have been involved in WT over the years:

My daughter, Lexie Conley, was once a Youth Board member -- the first and last.  She wrote an article on the history of environmentalism that was published in the WT's 25th Anniversary Issue of the newsletter.  Terry recruited her to lead the Green Team in a Derby Day parade...and work the booth. Lexie recruited her Key Club members to help restore a forest in what is now the Redmond Bike Park site.  Notably, Dick S. attended that.  The Key Club also spent a day restoring a northern Bear Creek tributary -- an ongoing WT project.

Susan Wilkins actively engaged her children in the environment.  Her daughter was a docent for the annual WT salmon "SEEson" event.  In 2007 her children surveyed the Camwest Perrigo Heights preliminary plat's northern forest boundary ...in preparation for the citizen/council/mayor/Eric Campbell's woodland march to the proposed Steep Slope sewer location.

Colorful salmon cut-outs were made for children. (don't have the details.)  Kiosks were built to educate children and adults. Exhibits were held at REI.  Terry Lavender worked at the Redmond Medical Center from where the Derby Day Children's Parade started every year. She organized the kids and I think gave them a short education on salmon before they took off on their bikes. 
### 

A 5-minute YouTube of Susan Willkin's presentation at the Annual Meeting:  https://youtu.be/_SfMBTinhqg

A slide show of my daughter and her Key Club/ Bio-Chem classmates restoring the Bear Creek tributary.