Tuesday, September 19, 2017

School District builds gigantic vaults on North Redmond Elementary project site.

Image result for north redmond elementary school imagesConstruction continues at the New Elementary School in North Redmond. Steel construction is expected to begin in the next 30 days. Two newly installed underground vaults will keep storm water clean at the school. The north vault has 138 panels with a capacity of 920,000 gallons of water (that’s the size of 1.4 Olympic-sized swimming pools). Watch a time-lapse of the construction on YouTube. This vault was built between August 14-22, 2017. Because the vault was built out of pre-fabricated panels, the installation time was shortened by four months.

Principal Barker is in the process of interviewing and hiring 12 general education staff members, and one of each specialist (counselor, PE teacher, music teacher, librarian and Special Education teacher).

-- LWSD

2 comments:

Richard Morris said...

I was curious about the location of this massive construction project, so I looked it up on the LWSD web site. Here is the link https://www.lwsd.org/programs-and-services/school-construction/major-construction/new-elementary-school-north-redmond/~board/elementary-schools/post/september-5-is-the-first-day-of-school-for-grades-1-12-find-your-school-supply-list-here

Here is the summary shown on the web site:
Architect: BLRB Architects
Contractor: BNBuilders Construction
Location: 172nd NE and NE 122nd, Redmond
Square Footage: 78,000
Spaces: 30 standard classrooms plus music, art/science rooms, ELL/SN/special education, library, cafeteria/commons, gymnasium, and outdoor covered play area
Estimated Project Cost: $43,257,000 (Includes construction costs of $26.5 million in 2016 dollars, $12.7 million in non-construction costs, and $4 million in expected construction inflation)
Planned opening: 2018
Neighborhood boundaries: Boundaries will be developed in a process including public feedback that begins January 2017.

Bob Yoder said...

Interesting Richard. It's too bad they couldn't have purchased land years ago that was less encumbered --and less expensive-- by infrastructure.